Dunloe Irish Terriers

Phone:  (717) 669-2375

Every terrier is bold in the doorway of its own house. Irish Proverb

About Dunloe Irish Terriers

In 1979 Bernie acquired his first Irish Terrier (Brocaire Rua Irish Gaelic for Irish Terrier) Molly McGee she came from a Breeder in Western Virginia. Molly shared a house with Asta a Wire Hair Fox Terrier for 16 years. As the years passed we developed an interest in showing, my partner Amy and I focused on a different breed through the 1990’s and owned and showed Chesapeake Bay Retrievers.

When our last Chessie “Harper” died we revisited the possibility of bringing an Irish back into the house. Over a Labor Day weekend I looked for Irish puppies but during that search I saw there was an IT who came into ITCA rescue due to the death of his owner. Over that weekend we had conversations with the ITCA rescue group and on Monday of Labor Day weekend we brought Rufus home. Rufus was the perfect fit for us. He was funny smart stubborn, loved to socialize with friends and children and a real Irish Gentleman. In fact, he would travel with me in my job at the time and was a big hit when we would visit clients. He became known as Rufus the “Donut Dog.”

In 2002 we brought Derry home Derry and Rufus became fast friends, Rufus served as both mentor and disciplinarian. They would play constantly. One of the favorite games was chasing each other around the kitchen table. Derry being a puppy, she would dart under the table and watch Rufus continue his circumnavigation of the kitchen. A picture of Rufus and Derry can be viewed on our Memory page.

Derry was the foundation of Dunloe Kennel; her daughter Mura, Mura’s daughter, Nora has given us Anya our current show dog.

While we breed occasionally you are welcome to return for information on upcoming litters and perhaps you will join the line of people who have grown to love and respect this very special breed of dog.

You are welcome to view pictures of all our current and past dogs. Links are displayed on the left side of the homepage. Please enjoy them because each and every one occupies a very special place in the continuing story of Dunloe Irish Terriers.


Dunloe Irish Terriers are bred for their Conformation to the Standard. Our puppies are bred primarily for their show potential and we also pay a great deal of attention to temperament since not all puppies are destined for the show ring. But all are companions.

Obtaining a puppy from us begins with a phone conversation after which the application found here is completed and reviewed. We require a one-on-one visit to meet with us. We ask this because we strive to match people (Families) and their lifestyle to a suitable puppy. It allows us the opportunity to meet people who may get one of our puppies. These requirements give you and your family the chance to interact with the adult dogs to help judge for yourself if an Irish is for you. Please visit the Irish Terrier Club of America web site found on our links page. The ITCA site offers a wealth of information on this special breed of dog.

We are active members of the Irish Terrier Club of New York, and Immediate Past AKC Delegate of the Irish Terrier Club of America. I am also the Immediate Past President and an active member of the Lancaster (PA) Red Rose Kennel Club.

PUPPY BUYERS BEWARE

• Because of the emotional investment in buying a puppy, scam artists can take advantage of unsuspecting consumers. Take the time to educate yourself on the hallmarks of a responsible breeder and on common scams.

• If you must buy a dog from someone who does not live near you, do your due diligence. Request references and speak to other people who have purchased dogs from this breeder. Ask if the breeder is a member of an AKC-affiliated club and contact that club to verify membership.

• Beware of any breeder who seems preoccupied with the financial aspect of the transaction. Any reputable breeder will be far more concerned with the appropriateness of the potential pet home than what and when they are getting paid. Make sure you have clear expectations - ideally in writing - of how and when the pup will be paid for. If the pup is shipped long distance, the best approach would be to pay for half up front and half upon receiving the puppy (and after getting a veterinarian to sign-off on the pup's health).

• If you located a breeder through a web site, don't ever send money without speaking to him/her on the phone and checking their references/credentials first. Unscrupulous breeders and even outright scams can be represented by professional-looking web sites that lure you in with beautiful pictures of adorable puppies that don't actually exist. Be especially wary of any breeder who insists that you wire money and who calls to ask for more money to be wired to cover last minute shipping fees.

• Beware of breeders who claim to have multiple breeds ready to ship immediately. It's highly unlikely that your perfect puppy would be available for shipping on the very day you call since gestation and socialization of a litter of puppies takes months before individual puppies can be placed with new owners.

For more information and an interesting article on breeders, please see this NAIA article on breeders.